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Colorado recycler working with Riverside Engineering to set up regional ASR processing plant.

Recycling Today Staff September 4, 2014

Andersen’s Sales and Salvage Inc., Greeley, Colorado, says it is nearing completion of its regional auto shredder residue (ASR) nonferrous processing facility in Greeley. The plant expansion is centered on a new patented separation method called “IQASR.” According to a news release from Andersen’s, the technology, also known as IQ, uses horizontal airflow to separate heavy fraction ASR from the light fraction. The “de-bulked” IQASR product has a singularity profile with removal of ferrous fines, according to the company.

 

“We have invested years of testing and refinement to reach this point where our IQ serves as the key component to achieving a market edge in maximizing metal recovery from ASR,” says Dean Andersen, owner of Andersen’s Sales and inventor of IQASR. The IQ densified product will be further processed at the Greeley plant with cascading layers of sensor, X-ray and optical equipment.

 

Dean Andersen contracted with Riverside Engineering, San Antonio, Texas, to design and lay out the selection of sensor and optical equipment for the new ASR plant. According to Andersen, “There are a lot of manufacturer options out there and it was critical to have Riverside’s assistance in evaluating the best fit for my new plant.”

 

Ultimately, Andersen selected downstream equipment from  MSS Inc., Steinert US, and Eriez.The plant is designed to process more than 50 tons per hour and is capable of running 24 hours a day. Overnight, the plant can run on an automated setting to support Andersen’s Sales’ plans to provide ASR processing to other regional shredding companies.

 

“Many processors are in a ‘wait and see’ mode on capital investments, while the Andersens are completely the opposite, charging ahead with their multi-million dollar facility,” says George Hipsher, Riverside Engineering’s national sales manager. “The nonferrous plant expansion comes five years after the company upgraded to Riverside’s M-88 shredder and ferrous downstream system.”

 

Andersen’s Sales and Salvage’s scrap metal facility sits on 38 acres and consists of a metal shredding operation, the new nonferrous plant and a self-serve auto parts business. Since the company’s founding in 1959, Kennie Andersen, along with his son Dean, have grown the family-owned business into what Hipsher calls a leading ferrous and nonferrous scrap processor in the northern Colorado region.

 

Riverside Engineering provides metal shredding products and services to recyclers, including the M-Series shredder and downstream systems.